In the last post we emphasized that the time in the garden was a time of probation for the first Adam. By working for six days and then resting on the seventh, God had already modeled for this first federal head, that if he would work to keep these commandments, that he too (along with all of his posterity after him) could enter into the covenant blessing of an eternal Sabbath rest; never again having to fear the possibility of disobedience to the Creator.

We also mentioned that during this period of probation, God placed one specific restriction upon them: they were not to eat from the tree in the middle of the garden. By submitting to God’s word, Adam and Eve would have the chance to learn the joy of living as trustful and dependant creatures.[1] “The Lord of the covenant, the Lord of the Edenic sanctuary in its double role of home-protectorate and temple, was thus man’s Father and his God.”[2] In this way, even as the second Adam would later demonstrate, “from the very beginning man was taught to pray trustingly: ‘Our Father which art in heaven,’ and to add worshipfully: ‘Hallowed be thy name.'”[3] . But also, due to Adam’s great eschatological hope of future sabbath kingdom blessing (of which the garden was but a prologue), “man would learn to continue his Lord’s prayer: “thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”[4]

Chapter three in Genesis sets the context for the entire Bible. At this time, a fallen angel (Satan) entered into the garden with all malice, duplicitously taking the form of a snake and offering to Adam and Eve another ‘word’. Deceitful and rebellious to the core, this word challenged the very goodness and truthfulness of the Great Suzerain, and promised more satisfaction than could be derived under their current treaty arrangement.

The evil one had thus revealed his rebellion, and this was the time for Adam to exercise his sacred office. He alone (as the great prophet, priest and king), was invested with the responsibility and authority “to repulse Satan’s profane encroachment into God’s sanctuary. . . Taking his stand as God’s warrior-priest, guardian of the holy ground of Har Magedon, he must declare the evil one evil, condemn his trespass, and repulse him. This task, signalized by the name of the tree of the knowing of good and evil, was indeed the critical task.” [5]

Tragically, as we know, Adam fails to discharge his duty. Indeed, he fails at multiple levels. At the heart of this failure, however, Adam and Eve are both shown to accept Satan’s word, and join in with the rebellion against Yahweh. And due to Adam’s kingly and federal office, this treasonous act had cosmic significance, sending “shock-waves throughout the whole of creation.”[6] The whole world was now ruined by their rebellion. And for the first time in human history, mankind began to run away from the presence of God. But, the real question was this: How would God respond to a world that had chosen to go its own way? We will look at God’s profound answer in the next post.

Notes:

  1. Bartholomew, C. and Goheen, M. The Story-Line of the Bible.
  2. Kline, M. G. (2006). Kingdom Prologue: Genesis Foundations for a Covenantal Worldview (p. 61). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid.
  5. Kline, M. G. (2006). God, Heaven and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos (p. 68). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers.
  6. Craig Bartholomew and Michael Goheen, “The Story-Line of the Bible”.

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